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-- and told history of the united states. it draws on archival findings and recently declassified documents. it examined everything from the cold war to the fall of communism, continuing through to the obama administration. this is a trailer for the miniseries. >> i want to make it as exciting as it can be. history is an interesting subject. we want to report what actually happened. you cannot just except what is handed down. this is the key to the whole series, is to find out how we got to where we are. it is a great, great story. >> that was the trailer for "the untold history of the united states." it will air on monday evenings at 8:00 p.m. and is available on demand. oliver stone joins us here in new york, and we are joined by his co-author, peter. we welcome you both to "democracy now." oliver stone, you have been working on this for years, and be announced to people. why? >> it was apri big job for need. i have been working on it for four and a half years. i recently discussed wallace and the bomb at one of his glasses and we ended up talking for about an hour, hour-and-a-half. walla
, ronald reagan, do solemnly swear, that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states and will come to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states. so help you god. >> so help me, god. [applause] ♪ ["hail to the chief" plays] >> >> the president of the united states. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. senator hatfield, mr. justice, mr. president, vice president bush, vice president mondale, senator baker, speaker o'neill, reverend moomaw, and my fellow citizens, to a few of us here today this is a solemn and most momentous occasion, and yet in the history of our nation it is a commonplace occurrence. the orderly transfer of authority as called for in the constitution routinely takes place, as it has for almost two centuries, and few of us stop to think how unique we really are. in the eyes of many in the world, this every-4-year ceremony we accept as normal is nothing less than a miracle. mr. president, i want our fellow citizens to know how much you did to carry on this tradition. by your gracious cooperation in
. >> the united states will not ignore your oppression or excuse your oppressors. >> all are equal, all are free and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness. >>> we're across from the white house where president obama is getting ready to take the oath of office. >>> and here on the national mall, everything is in place for a huge party and all of america is invited. >>> a president who broke barriers and inspired the nation four years ago now begins a second term. a second chance to restore hope and bring change. >> despite all the hardship we've been through, despite all the frustrations of washington. i've never been more hopeful about our future. and i ask you to sustain that hope. >> the pomp, the parade, the inaugural balls will come tomorrow, but this is the day that truly mattered. when the president must raise his hand and swear to protect and defend the constitution. >> so help you god? >> so help me god. >>> we're here in the heart of washington, d.c., with spectacular views of the u.s. capitol and the national mall. a two-day inaugural event is getting under way
on the united states supreme court when he was appointed by president madison in 1812. he made a significant mark on american law in his 33 years on the bench, but his greatest contribution to the jurisprudence is his renowned commentary on the constitution. eminently quoted joseph story famously incorrectly declared, quote, a constitution of government is addressed to the common sense of the people and never was designed for trials of logical skills or visionary speculation and of quote. this lecture series celebrates the legacy into law. prior to the joseph story lectures have been and judge robert bork, professor john harrison at the university school of law, judge raymond randolph of the united states court of appeals for the d.c. circuit, and last year chief justice of the united states court of appeals for the sixth circuit. tonight we are honored to have a fifth name to the prestigious list as we welcome justice anthony kennedy who will deliver this evening's joseph story distinguished lecture on the topic, t
you around the world in 60 minutes. we begin with nuclear threats against the united states. north korea announced plans to test more nuclekes and more lon range rocket launches. north korea's defense commission calls america the sworn enemy of the korean people. i want to get straight to new york. >> the words are very threatening. it is very incredible to hear them directly threaten united states in that way just ahead of what they say will be another nuclear test. what i'm hearing and what analysts are saying is that is probably how one would have expected them to react. it comes just a day after yet more u.s. action and u.n. action at the security council and more sanction action. most people believe this is not a threat of attacking the united states but certainly the words are threatening to the united states. they say analysts that this is north korea's way of trying to deter any further action from the international community. and that they have no capacity to invade in terms of long range missiles to reach the u.s. it is a serious issue if they do test any kind of nuclear
. >> the constitution of the united states. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> congratulations. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states. [applause] >> for myself and for our nation, i want to thank my predecessor for all he has done to heal our land. [applause] in this outward and physical ceremony, we attest once again to the inner and spiritual strength of our nation. as my high school teacher, miss julia coleman, used to say, "we must adjust to changing times and still hold to unchanging principles." here before me is the bible used in the inauguration of our first president, in 1789, and i have just taken the oath of office on the bible my mother gave me just a few years ago, opened to a timeless admonition from the ancient prophet micah -- "he hath showed thee, o man, what is good, and what doth the lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy god." this inauguration ceremony marks a new beginning, a new dedication within our government, and a new spirit among us all. a president may sense and proclaim that new
, wicked, jekyll & hyde all getting together at the end of this month raise money for the united way. >> bill: good for them. good for them. thank you dan. yes, indeed, an historic day at the white house. i got out of my sickbed to go down for the announcement in the east room. president obama coming out at 1:10 and announcing the final two members of the national security team. last week he nominated john kerry, a great choice to be secretary of state. yesterday, he presented to the world his next two picks. >> obama: to help meet the challenges of our time, i'm proud to announce my choice for two key members of my national security team. chuck hagel for secretary of defense and john brennan for directorror of the central intelligence agency. >> bill: the president was adamant in his praise of hagel who the president befriended when he was a member of the senate traveled with him to iraq and afghanistan, got to know him as independent centrist moderate, republican. and was willing to stand up to the leaders of his own party and say they were wrong. originally voted for the war in ir
too much of obama he says because in the united states, we subscribe to the quote, unquote myth of the imperial presidency. other transformational democratic presidents such as fdr and lbj, rockman says, have substantial democratic majorities in both the senate and in the house to enact their landmark legislation. obama in contrast has had to work with a narrow democratic majority in the senate and with an opposition party, the republicans in control of the house for the two years since january 2011. well, what about ronald reagan? president of the united states two successful four-year terms. on the domestic front, he enacted a major economic recovery package followed by an overhaul of social security. and in his second term, reagan gained a major tax reform. on the defense front, republican president reagan again with the help of the rity presided over a major increase in the defense budget, congress presided over a major increase in the defense budget, the defe including straby millions of protesters here and abroad. also commander in chief reagan gained secret aid for freedo
to risk the full faith and credit of the united states for whatever agenda you have. the business community felt that. the public felt that. and so the fact that they have backed off both -- not only the idea that we should hold debt ceiling hostage, but second that it shouldn't be one for one cuts, you know, boehner used to say that, the house proposal doesn't say that, dollar in cutting for every dollar in raising the debt ceiling. >> would you support a short-term measure to force you to pass a budget? >> i think it should be longer because we don't want to play fiscal cliff every three months. but it's a positive step. >> you never get a clean debt ceiling raise. >> yes, you should. >> that's not a question of whether you should. but historically it's not been the case. >> mitch mcconnell proposed it two years ago and we passed it. but let me say this on the budget. we democrats have always intended to do a budget this year. for two reasons. first, it is not true that we haven't had budget control in effect over the last several years. the budget control act of 2011 put rigid
homes. because of the demand in housing . all of a sudden into the congress of the united states of the says we are going to put the full faith and credit of the united states of america on a 90-day leash. we are going to take the greatest economy in the greatest country, with the greatest responsibility in the world and we are going to put them on a 0-day leash. . how does a great country respond on a 90-day leash? we know what happened the world saw this happened. we got downgraded in the credit rating. that drove up the cost of borrowing in the united states. that drove up the borrowing cost of corporations. that drove up the costs of counties and cities that we represent. and we're told again that should we falter on the credit debt of the united states, that we can expect a downgrade and we can expect a further downgrade in cities and counties all over the country. and somehow we're supposed to believe this is a good plan. what this plan does -- can i have three additional minutes? mr. mcgovern: i yield the gentleman two additional minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gent
of a dignitary, in this case, the president of the united states. that is a way of saluted the dignitary, showing due deference and respect, and then we will play "yankee doodle" and then some traditional metal is before -- from the 18th-century arranged for today. ♪ [fifes playing] >> i am with the fife and drum corps. for this year, it has been strenuous preparing for the inauguration. we have had multiple rehearsals, marching, trying to get everything perfect. we also are premiering one of cowardice sequences, corporate sequences, and we are memorized in the last few months. >> in preparation for the parade, we do or rehearsals. we had a lot of music to learn. we rehearsed it together. individually, we memorized the music. then we added it to the marching. that was a whole nother process of getting precise, getting in sync. marching together, finding music simultaneously. >> this will be my fifth inaugural parade. i first was for president clinton's second in operation in 1997. each one -- second inauguration in 1997. each one is special. i have and in a different place in my career each tim
to be the president of the united states or something like that. jumping the gun a little bit. officials from south carolina and new hampshire. just want to mention that. who knows what the field will look like in a couple of years. a broad overview. not looking backwards but looking forward. giving the grand vision. perhaps, mentioning some of the issues he wants to tackle. gun control, deficit reduction. as you said, waiting on the big details until the state of the union address. neil: you mentioned finding common ground. we may have gotten a hint on that when republicans said they would look at eight debt ceiling it ascension back ago, probably, three months. what do you make of that? don: they would be blamed, roundly, thoroughly if the country went into some kind of default. the strategy, as you have been reporting, has been to try to take this issue off the table and then fight the battle over spending cuts when you have a sequestration cuts scheduled to start march 1. the current resolution running the government also running out into her three months from now. as well as, the debt ceiling
of the united states senate. i do not run to make history. i ran to make a difference. a difference in the lives of families 75 doric and pay the bills. students who are struggling with debt. the difference in the lives of veterans who fought for us and need someone fighting for them when they return home from war. the difference in the lives of all intrapreneur is trying to build a business and working people trying to build economic security. i ran to make a difference. i intend to make a difference. just like nobody runs and wins a senate race alone, no one moves a country forward alone. just like i could not have won the election without the people in this very room, we cannot move the nation forward without your continued involvement. look around you in this room today. it is extraordinary. on monday, looked across the mall. everywhere there are women whose leadership can change the course of history. thousands of them make a decision about whether to seek public office. too many will hear the voices of the senate. those that turn to emily's list training andl find wh support. many will run
ronald regan and one of the most decorated veterans of vietnam. united states senator. celebrated author. lawyer. and i thought he made a pretty strong, persuasive case. so did many of us. >> let's turn to cybersecurity. i was pleased that you mentioned cyber security in your initial remarks. they have moved expand its cyber security efforts. i have to talk about colorado. the air force academy is well positioned to train those. would you talk a little more on your take on cyber security and what sort of resources we need. >> i've been to those facilities in colorado a few times and don't know as much about them as you do, but i am familiar with them. they are essential to our national security. cyber, i believe represents as big a threat to the security of this country as any one specific threat. for all the reasons this committee understands. it's an insidious quiet, kind of a threat that we have never quite seen before. it can paralyze a nation in a second. not just a power grid or banking system. but it can knock out satellites. it can take down computers on all our carrier battle s
was the real 12th president of the united states. >> chris taylor is in charge of what he calls the world's smallest presidential library. a tribute to the 24 hours the late senator from missouri spent as president david rice atchison. it's a nanosecond in history. also etched into atchison's grave stone. a great little asterisk, except almost universally historians say atchison was never president. >> it's a con seat, actually. atchison used to joke about it, atchison's term had come to a conclusion as well. he didn't take his oath of office either as a senator or president, in case of emergency they would have turned to the incoming president, zachary taylor. >> reporter: without twitter, facebook or cnn, news of emergencies travelled a lot slower in 1849. so there was no reason to explore the power vacuum at the time. in fact, atchison slept most of the day, tuckered out bay lot of last-minute business in the senate, some things never change. still, some of atchison's friends reportedly could not resist. >> that night, some of his colleagues in the senate woke him up in the middle of t
and on the month, the vice president of the united states and dr. biden accompanied by justice sotomayor. [applause] >> devised for the that has asked that we bless this occasion with prayer. let us pray. . micah blames you have been told what is good and what the board requires of you, only to do justice into love goodness, to walk calmly with your god. gracious god, at this moment in our history, we ask more blessing on your servant, joseph, as he renews his a broad pledge to his country. amid all the complexities of our world, the world's a beautiful but broken, give him a share of your residence and that he can know what is good and give him the courage to always do what is right. walk close by so that he can do justice and labored tirelessly for a more just and gentle world. empower him to be a voice for those without a voice, those on the margins, so easily overlooked. he will judge us all for how we care of the least among us. continue to give him the humility to always call upon you in times of need and with the gift of faith given to him by his church and family, help him to always know of
of the president of the united states. >> the office of president of the united states. >> and will to the best of my ability. >> and will to the best of my ability. >> preserve, protect and defend. >> preserve, protect and defend. >> the constitution of the united states. >> the constitution of the united states. >> so help you god. >> so help me god. >> congratulations, mr. president. >> thank you, mr. chief justice, thank you so much. [ applause ] >> thank you, sweetie. >> hey. thank you. i did it. all right. thank you, everybody. >> the president hugging his wife, the first lady, and his daughters, malia and sasha after taking that oath. he's going to do it again, he'll take the public ceremony oath and give his second inaugural address tomorrow, he's only the 17th president in u.s. history to make a second address. >> president obama followed the swearing inned to today with a wreath-laying ceremony and the martin luther king jr. memorial. vice president joe biden was also sworn if for his second term in office. >> the ceremony took place this morning at the naval observatory, which was th
personnel, ready for this event. we have snipers on the roofs. we have biological and chemical units prepared to deal with whatever comes up. we have a high degree of surveillance. satellites zooming in on the mall, as well as hundreds of surveillance cameras, to watch potential suspects. as one official told me last night, we have no specific threat. but we have to be ready for anything, george. >> and i know they've been preparing for this for a year. they've been locking the buildings on the parade route. they've been locking the garbage cans on the parade route. repaved the road. they are taking no chances. we have an incredible team of presidential savvy with us this morning. i want a quick word from two of them sitting with us here. let's start with matthew dowd, contributor to abc news. you have contributed to a combine, as well. both sides of the aisle. what does it take for a president to take a second inauguration and make it soaring? >> well, it's a much different situation when you go from the first to the second. the first one, everybody's filled with hope. we can make c
in for his second term as the 44th president of the united states. good morning. i'm gwen eiffel and welcome to his pbs news hour special coverage of today's nailingration. >> i'm jeffrey brown. it's a bright sunny day here in washington. temperatures remain in the 30's. that's a bit warmer than four years ago for the president's first inauguration. that of course saw a record-setting crowd, nearly 2 million people. no one is expecting anything quite like that this time around but still, folks have been finding spaces on the mall tonight since the sun came up. you can see them setting up spots now. we will be covering the entire inaugural ceremony live. and if you're not at your tv you can watch our live stream on our home page at news hour.pbs.org or follow us on twitter. >> this earmarks the 150th anniversary of the man'spation proclamation. you can see bill and hillary clinton on the podium. there are also people there celebrating the election of the first african-american president. president obama is only the 16th sitting chief executive to be returned to office. he is the first preside
of the united states. >> the political theater and dignified simplicity, designed to show off a new nation's representativive government. today is special because it's sunday. tomorrow is the ceremonial swearing in on the mall. >> in this day and age, inaugurations have their own set of challenges. we will go over over the logistics and the schedule and the security. >> the formal swearing in is today. today is january 20, the constitutionally mandated day the president must be sworn in. that takes place in about an hour at the white house. we will get a preview from ed henry. >> good morning. interesting, the crowd's a lot smaller than they were four years ago. but still, as you noted, a lot of pomp and circumstance. it started when the president went to arlington national cemetery, met up with vice-president biden. there was a laying of a wreath at the tomb of the unknowns. the vice-president had been sworn in already this morning, a little bit earlier than the president. that's in part because he was sworn in by justice sotomayor who has a book signing this afternoon in new york city. t
and politics, overturn the citizens united and the rest, and increase the level of civility in politics, we will change the environment in which politics is conducted. we will elect many more women to public office. that is a very good thing for our country. thank you, emily's list. we are emily, and we ain't seen nothing yet. thank you all. [applause] >> a look at the jefferson memorial. president obama's public inauguration as tomorrow, which happens to be allocated. -- mlk day. [indistinct conversations] >> large crowds gathered here this weekend at the immelt came memorial. we have live inauguration coverage starting tomorrow -- mlk memorial. we have live inauguration coverage starting tomorrow. next, a look at how u.s. presidents have feared his starkly in their second term. the specific -- have faced in their second term. host: want to welcome author and historian richard norton smith. the most memorable second term address was by abraham lincoln. guest: there are people who thinks that it outranks the gettysburg address. it is the greatest way sermon ever delivered in america. anyone
statements is made on israel and the united states, that our policy of non-engagement with the syrians as, "isolated us more than the syrians," and a 2009 statement that "we should not isolate hamas," a terrorist organization. there is much to be explored at this hearing. but as we struggle with the difficult security challenges facing our nation, the president needs to have a secretary of trust,e in whom he has stresse who will give him unvarnished advice, a person of integrity, and one who has a personal understanding of the consequences of decisions relative to the use of military force. senator hagel certainly has those critically important qualifications to lead the department of defense. senator inhofe. >> thank you, mr. chairman. first of all, i would like to echo your remarks about secretary panetta and the work he has done. i don't see him here today, but i do recall that when he was first nominated, i was probably one of the first phone calls to him, and i have enjoyed working with him and a mccain, the same way, i continue to depend on his counsel. you and i have worked very we
this in a one-three month time when. why should we do that? where the united states of america. we cannot manage our affairs in such a way that we pay our bills and provide certainty in terms of how we pay our bills? look. i do not think anyone would consider my position on reasonable. major, i am happy to have a conversation about how we reduce our deficits. i'm not going to have a monthly or every three months conversation about whether or not we pay our bills. that in and of itself does severe damage. even the threat of default hurts our economy. it hurts our economy as we speak. if we want to have a conversation about how to reduce our deficit, let's do it. we have been having that for the last two years. we just had an entire campaign about it. the american people agreed with me that we should reduce our deficits in a balanced way that takes into account the need to grow this economy and put people back to work. despite that conversation and despite the election results, the position that has been taken on the part of house republicans is that we have to do it our way. if we don't, we simpl
, crazy sons had one is an officer in the united states navy reserve. [applause] x i want to introduce you to the whole family. my daughter, who is a social worker. [laughter]>> this is my daughter in law. >> my number three granddaughter. my number two granddaughter, my number three granddaughter, my number four, and i want you to say hello to hunter, and the love of my life, i oldest granddaughter, who is crazy about me, a freshman in college now, naomi. i want to introduce my third son. i told my daughter when she married him, i said if you change your mind, i am keeping an. -- keeping him. [laughter][applause] i would be happy to claim it as my daughter, [indiscernible] this is a family affair. i have watched you come through. family, kids, grandkids, mothers, fathers. you all get why this is so important today heard -- today. we still have 60,000 troops in harms way. one of the things that you all know, in the national guard that are here today, they are not looking for anything. knowing that you remembered, knowing that we back home just remembered, we know what is going on -- this i
is a look at the events today. vice president of the united states, accompanied by justice sonia sotomayor. [applause] >> the vice president has asked for -- ask that we bless the occasion with prayer. so, let us pray. the profit micah reclaims did you have been told, mortal, what is good, and what the board requires a view, only to do justice and love goodness, walking calmly with your dog. -- god. gracious god, we ask your blessing on your servant, joseph, as he renews the pledge he made to his country. in all the complexities that, this world, give us your wisdom so that he can know what is good and give him the courage to always do what is right. walk close by him so that he can do justice and labored tirelessly for a more just and gentle world. empower him to be a voice for those without a voice. for those on the margins, so easy -- easily overlook, you will judge us all for how we care for those among us. continue to give him the humility to call upon him in times of need and with the gift of faith given to him by his church and family, help him to always know of your presence. lord,
. that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states. >> the office of the president of the united states. >> and will to the best of my ability, preserve , protext and defend. >> preserve, protect and defend the constitution of the united states. >> so help me god. congratulations, mr. president. [ applause ] >> dana: good evening. thank you for joining us on this special day. hours ago on the steps of u.s. capitol, president obama took the oath of office for the second time as his wife michelle and his lovely daughters looked on. a beautiful brisk day in the nation's capitol and hundreds of thousands were there to watch the historic moment, which happened to fall on the day we remember, martin luther king junior. here is part of his speech. >> what binds this nation together is not the colors of our skin or the tenets of our faith, or the origins of our names. what makes us exceptionalbe, and what makes us american, is our allegiance to our idea articulated in a declaration made more than two centuries ago. we hold these truths to be self-evident. t
. >> the office of president of the united states. >> the office of president of the united states. >> and will to the best of my ability. >> and will to the best of my ability. >> preserve, protect and defend. >> preserve, protect and defend. >>> have the constitution of the united states. >> the constitution of the united states. >> so help you god. >> so help me god. >> there won't be a doover because the actual swearing in took place yesterday. also unlike last time, the first time ever to mention rights for, equal rights for gays and lesbians and a much bolder statement in many ways in mr. obama's governing philosophy from here on out. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still. just as it guided our forebearers through seneca falls and stone wall, a it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung who left footprints along this great mall to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone, to hear a king proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every s
of president of the united states. >> the office of president of the united states. >> and will to the best of my ability. >> and will to the best of my ability. >> preserve, protect and defend. >> the constitution of the united states. >> so help me god. >> congratulations, mr. president. >> a slight stumble there. >> the first speech to ever mention equal rights for gays and lesbians and mr. obama's governing philosophy from here on out. >> we the people declare today that the most evident of truths that all of us are created equal is the star that guides us still just as it guided our forebearers through seneca falls and selma and stonewall, just as it guided all those men and women sung and unsung who left footprints along this great mall to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk away, to hear a king proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every sole honor. >> a very big day for temperature, for washington, for the country, very exciting day if you're fascinated by the clash of political ideas. we'll be looking at the speech as politics and poetry,
like immigration, for instance, i think this is something that could actually unite us again as a country because americans know that's who we are as a people. we're a country of immigrants. we've really benefitted tremendously from being able to tap human potential from all over the world. but you can't do it from the point of view of "i'm going to put this down and then you take it or leave it" because there are some deep divisive-- divisive issues within the immigration debate that are going to have to be smooth over. so the american people-- i live out in california. i don't live here in washington. and i will tell you that out in the country there's a sense that washington is divided and that's not a good thing for america. >> let me just take a break here. we'll talk about this. i sure want to get back to talking about guns a little bit. but we'll take a break here for one minute. we're sitting on a bunch of shale gas. there's natural gas under my town. it's a game changer. ♪ ♪ it means cleaner, cheaper american-made energy. but we've got to be careful how we get it
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 304 (some duplicates have been removed)

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